Monthly Archives: December 2011

Data Mining From Your Software

Do you know how to make your genealogical software give you a list or report of all people in your database born in a certain location in a certain time period? If you have not learned how to “mine” your own database, find out.  Lists of this type can be helpful when searching for additional information.

January 2012 Genealogy Webinars

Our series of January 2012 genealogy webinars have been announced:

  • Illinois Research
  • Using Archive.org
  • Newspaper Research
  • Tips and Tricks for FamilySearch.org
Sessions are an hour long and registrants who are unable to attend will receive complimentary download links. 
Details and registrations can be processed on our website at http://www.casefileclues.com/webinars_neill.htm. Registration is limited.

Lessor versus Lessee

If a document refers to your ancestor as the lessor on lease–he owns the property that is the subject of the lease. If your ancestor is referred to as the lessee, he is the person being given temporary use of the property. The lessor owns it, the lessee borrows it–generally speaking.

Census Provides Clues as to Property Ownership

Remember there are several United States censuses that provide evidence of ownership of real property. Some ask for values of real property, others ask if the home was owned or rented. Documenting that land ownership through local land records may lead to additional information on your ancestor. Are you getting all the clues from the census?

Did You Stop After Just One Site

Remember–no site has every record, every file, and every index.

Don’t do all your research via one website, one repository, or one library.

You wouldn’t just use the census only for your research would you?
Expand your research horizons and your family tree–use a resource or a facility today that you’ve not used in a while. You may be pleasantly surprised at what you find.

Died in 1900 at the age of 30

Remember that if someone truly died at the age of 30 in 1900, they could have been born in 1869 or 1870 depending upon when their date of birth was in relationship to the date they died.  If they were born in 4 March 1869, they would be 30 on any document in 1900 dated before 4 March and 31 on any document dated on 4 March or after.

So if a tombstone says the person died in 1900 at the age of 30, they could have been born in 1869 or 1870, if only the years are given on the stone.

Whether or not the age is correct in the first place is another matter.