Is There More?

Online indexes can lead you to an image of a record with a quick search–if you are lucky enough that names are spelled and indexed correctly. Make certain the “next image” isn’t part of the item you located. Census records may be split over two pages, draft cards are often images of the front and back of the card, death certificates sometimes contain “supplements” directly after the original document.

Always look at the next image or two in any online set of images to make certain you’ve got it all–and look forward too as well.

You’ll never know until you look.

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Your Own Memories and History

When was the last time you wrote some of your own personal history and memories? It’s always ironic to discover a genealogist who has worked up many of their families and spent years searching for personal ephemera from their own relatives only to not leave any such record of their own memories, life, and experiences.

A Facebook fan mentioned that she keeps a Word document open so that whenever a personal post I make reminds her of something she can immediately go and write about it before she forgets. That’s an excellent idea. Working on such writing is an excellent idea when you are stuck and at a seemingly impasse in your own research. The diversion may give the subconscious parts of your mind to contemplate your problem while you are leaving behind a little something about yourself.

Don’t forget to leave behind for others that which we wish others had left behind for us.

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Genealogy Tip of the Day Book

We’re still excited about the release of Genealogy Tip of the Day–the book. Repeat tips, time-sensitive items, and marketing material has been removed. It’s just tips–and a few pictures. Purchase options include:

Thanks!

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Don’t Forget: Funeral Home Websites

Online newspapers and obituary websites are a great way to find obituaries of recently deceased individuals. Do not limit your search to only the individual online newspaper and compilation sites of published obituaries like www.legacy.com. View the funeral home and view their version of the website. That obituary may be different from the one published in an online newspaper, particularly dependent upon the newspaper’s charge.

Genealogy Tip of the Day book is here. Learn more about it.

If you’d like to get our genealogy tip daily in your email for free, add your address here.

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Nearest Relatives on Draft Cards

I always make it a habit to search for World War I and II draft cards for just about any relative who was of an age to have registered. Besides the details on the registrant, the name of the person “who will always know your residence” can be helpful as it may give addresses for individuals who are otherwise difficult to trace.

You may even discover someone listed when you do not expect it. My uncle had been married for near twenty years when he registered for the World War II draft. Instead of listing his wife, he picked his sister Fannie–my great-grandma.

Genealogy Tip of the Day book is here. Learn more about it.

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Informal Adoption Confusing Your DNA Results?

A reasonably close DNA match whose seemingly complete tree contains no names that match can be confusing. The difficulty is determining where the problem rests. An informal adoption is one reason this can happen. A relatively close relative who was born in the 1870s reminded me of this. Initial research on him located records towards the end of his life which covered the time period from his 1912 marriage until his death in the 1940s. Several children with this wife were mentioned in various records. When I worked to complete the gap between his birth and his 1912 marriage, a more accurate chronology was completed:

  • living in Nebraska in 1880 and 1900 census (with parents)–from census records;
  • married in Nebraska 1901–marriage record;
  • child was born in 1904 in Nebraska–1910 census;
  • living as a family in 1910 in Nebraska–1910 census;
  • wife and husband both marry again in 1912 (in different states)–images of county marriage records;
  • wife and second husband living together in 1920–child born in 1904 is listed as child of second husband—1920 census;
  • various later records list the child born in 1904 as being the son of the mother’s second husband and child is listed in various records with that last name throughout the duration of his life–including his tombstone.

Descendants of this son born in 1904 could very easily take a DNA test. Their tree could easily be full of names back quite a few generations and I’ll see none that resonate with me because the adopted father (who raised the child) is on the pedigree chart.

So if that close match has a complete tree and nothing seems even close, keep in mind that all it takes is the name of one non-biological great-grandfather to throw off one-eighth of the names going further back. If the error is closer, the proportion of wrong names gets even higher.

It’s also possible that an informal adoption in your own tree–that you don’t know about–is making your results more confusing.

Genealogy Tip of the Day book is here. Learn more about it.

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Are You Getting All Probate Records?

In most counties in the United States, probate records come in one of two forms: record copies of legal documents created during the probate process which are typically recorded in bound volumes and files/packets containing original copies of documents that were used to settle up the estate.

Depending upon the time period and the location, there may be several different types of record volumes of probate records: bonds, wills, appraisements, inventories, etc. Occasionally the record copy contains handwriting that is easier to read than the original document or annotations that are not on the original. The file/packet of loose papers may contain items that are not recorded in the bound volume.

For those reasons, it is advised to search both the record copies and the file/packet of papers–if the location has them both.

Genealogy Tip of the Day book is here. Learn more about it.

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Date of Marriage Contract

In some locations and in some time periods, couples may have executed a marriage contract which outlined which property belonged to the future husband and which property belonged to the future wife. These documents were to clarify how property would be distributed when one member of the future couple died.

The date of the marriage contract is not the date of the marriage. It is the date that the contract was executed. There is also the possibility that the couple never actually married.

Genealogy Tip of the Day book is here. Learn more about it.

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A Separate Tree for DNA Match Analysis?

I have my “good” tree where information is documented and sourced to the best of my ability. That tree is tied to my DNA results.

Hopefully your tree doesn’t look like this.

Then I have a working tree that I keep private and is for my use only. It’s used for analyzing my DNA matches. It contains what was in my “good tree” and other information I’ve added but not necessarily always validated as much as I should. It contains information on ancestors of various cousins and DNA matches who are not my own direct line ancestors. It contains information I’ve compiled in my attempts to determine the connections I have with some of my DNA matches. That way I don’t duplicate work trying to figure out matches and sometimes while working on a new match I discover that I’ve got part of their connection to me already figured out.

But my working tree is not made public and is for my use only.

Genealogy Tip of the Day book is here. Learn more about it.

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What Old Conclusion Have You Reviewed Lately?

There’s a certain thrill to discovering something that we don’t know. Some genealogists are constantly on the hunt for something “new” that they neglect to revisit those conclusions that were reached years ago, were taken as truth based on a relative’s statement, or came from a document that “had to be correct.”

Failure to revisit can be a mistake. That mistake is how some mistakes get passed down and shared with future generations. Even if revisiting does not uncover errors, additional information can be obtained and a greater picture of the family who was “already known” emerges.

Don’t forget there is a thrill of discovery in finding something is incorrect as well. The thrill is lessened when it was your own mistake. Those should be embraced as well–as opportunities for growth.

Genealogy Tip of the Day book is here. Learn more about it.

If you’d like to get our genealogy tip daily in your email for free, add your address here.

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